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The electric vehicle revolution does indeed seem to be underway, but some remain skeptical. Recently, a Ford executive reportedly stated at the Reuters Events Automotive Summit that some commercial vehicle customers remain hesitant to EV adoption.

Welcome to Headlight. This is a daily news feature that lights up one current event in the car world and breaks it down by three simple subheadings: What Happened, Why It Matters, and What To Look For Next. Look for it in the morning (Eastern time) every weekday.

What Happened

Chief Executive of Ford Pro (the automaker’s fleet and commercial sales department) Ted Cannis is sourced in a Reuters report that said some fleet customers are apprehensive to switching to electric vehicles, namely the fully electric E-Transit van and forthcoming F-150 Lightning pickup truck. Some of this is due to ignorance, as contractors and fleet customers are unfamiliar with EVs and remain skeptical. Another reason includes a lack of clarity surrounding government policy and regulations surrounding EVs. Cannis is quoted as saying that Ford expects one-third of the pickup truck market will be fully electric by 2030.

Why It Matters

Across the globe, the legislative arms in nearly every country are encouraging drivers to switch to fully electric vehicles. In California, the plan is to outright ban the sale of combustion engine vehicles by 2035. These new regulations don’t often include carve-outs for fleet drivers, either. So, contractors, bus drivers, and anyone who uses and maintains vehicles for work would eventually need to switch. If fleet workers continue to push back, that could spell real trouble for any legislation that forces its hand without reconciling concerns behind electric vehicles.

What To Expect Next

Conversations behind electric vehicle adoption could change, as lawmakers continue to refine their plans for increasing EV adoption. On the national level, growing concerns from tradesmen and fleet customers could push the Biden Administration to get more aggressive with government incentives and establish a better charging network.

Ford claims that demand for the fully-electric F-150 Lightning is very high, at more than 150,000 orders from fleet and retail customers. Potentially, if this product proves to be viable for fleets that have fewer qualms about shifting to electric, it could reduce hesitancy and inspire more apprehensive customers to make the switch.

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